Changing infant formula

If you have decided to change your baby’s current formula, the transition should occur slowly to allow your baby’s digestive system to adjust.

There are many reasons that may lead you to switch your baby’s current infant or follow-on formula (formula) to another brand or type of formula, but if you are unsure about whether a particular formula is right for your baby, please consult your baby’s doctor, maternal and child health nurse or dietitian. You should also consult your baby’s healthcare practitioner if he or she has any special nutrition needs before switching formulae, including whether he or she was born prematurely or was of low birth weight.

If you have decided to change your baby’s current formula, the transition should occur slowly to allow your baby’s digestive system to adjust gradually. The taste profile will also differ between formulae, so this may be another reason why your little one will need some time to get used to a new formula gradually.

For a general example of how to introduce a new formula by stages and then replace the original formula altogether, refer to the example in the table below. Of course, there are various possible feed volume combinations for making the transition to a new formula and the guide below is just one example. It is based on a 4-6 month old baby who is having four feeds per day, but the example below can also provide an idea of how to introduce a new formula gradually to a baby of any age (i.e. by substituting a new formula for an initially small but increasing volume of the current formula). As feed volumes vary depending on a baby’s age, brand and type of formula, be sure to refer to the feeding guide on the can for age-specific recommendations and follow the preparation instructions carefully.

If you have any concerns about your baby’s tolerance to a new formula, consult your baby’s doctor, maternal and child health nurse or dietitian.

Note: When preparing your baby’s formula, be sure to use the scoop enclosed inside the formula can and use separate bottles for the different formulae in order to ensure the correct preparation of each feed for your baby.

Instructions for introducing new formula gradually

 

Day One

Substitute around 50ml of the new formula at the start of one feed/day

Start by feeding your baby the new formula made up using one scoop of powder plus the correct amount of sterilised water as directed in the preparation instructions, then finish the feed using your current brand with around 50ml less of his/her normal intake.

Continue to use your normal feed patterns for all other feeds during day one.

 

Day Two

Substitute around 50ml of the new formula at the start of two feeds/day

Continue to feed your baby the new formula made up using one scoop of powder plus the required amount of sterilised water as directed in the preparation instructions, but today do this for two feeds. Finish each of these two feeds using your current brand with around 50ml less of his/her normal intake.

Continue to use your normal feed patterns for all other feeds during day two.

 

Day Three

Substitute around 100ml of the new formula at the start of two feeds/day

Today, feed your baby the new formula made up using two scoops of powder plus the required amount of sterilised water as directed in the preparation instructions for two feeds, then finish each of these two feeds using your current brand with around 100ml less of his/her normal intake.

Continue to use your normal feed patterns for all other feeds during day three.

 

Day Four

Substitute around 100ml of the new formula at the start of three feeds/day

Continue to feed your baby the new formula made up using two scoops of powder plus the required amount of sterilised water as directed in the preparation instructions, but today do this for three feeds. Finish each of these three feeds using your current brand with around 100ml less of his/her normal intake.

Continue to use your normal feed patterns for all other feeds during day four.

 

Day Five

Substitute around150ml of the new formula at the start of three feeds/day

Today, feed your baby the new formula made up using three scoops of powder plus the required amount of sterilised water as directed in the preparation instructions for three feeds, then finish each of these feeds using your current brand with around 150ml less of his/her normal intake.

Continue to use your normal feed patterns for all other feeds during day five.

 

Day Six

Substitute around 150ml of the new formula at the start of four feeds/day

Continue to feed your baby the new formula made up using three scoops of powder plus the required amount of sterilised water as directed in the preparation instructions but today do this for four feeds. Finish each of these four feeds using your current brand with around 150ml less of his/her normal intake.

Continue to use your normal feed patterns for all other feeds during day six.

 

Day Seven

Replace four feeds/day

By this stage, you can offer the new formula entirely to your baby for every feed.

 

Once your baby is tolerating four feed per day, it should be okay to change over entirely to a2 Platinum®.

If you need more specific guidance for your baby, please contact the Australian a2CARELINE on 1800 22 46 32 (1800 a2infant) or the New Zealand a2 CARELINE on 0800 22 46 32 (0800 a2infant).

Bowel motions and urine output

It is not uncommon for a baby’s bowel motions to change when switching between formula. Stools may become a little firmer or softer, but should not be dry and solid or watery-like in consistency. If your baby’s bowel motions become dry and solid, check that your baby is having the right amount of formula and also that the formula is being prepared correctly (refer to the preparation instructions and feeding guide on the back of the can). Although individual differences will occur, a baby’s bowel motions will usually be loose and mustard-yellow (sometimes with milk curds) in colour, though sometimes they may have a green or orange appearance. If your baby is experiencing frequent, watery bowel motions (i.e. diarrhoea), consult your baby’s GP or healthcare practitioner.

Your baby should have around six or more wet nappies per day. The nappies should be soaked and contain a pale or colourless urine. If your baby’s urine becomes scanty and yellow in colour, check that your baby is having the right amount of properly prepared formula (refer to the feeding guide on the back of the can).

If you have any concerns regarding your little one’s bowel motions or urinating frequency, consult your baby’s GP or healthcare practitioner.

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